Two Dogs Dreaming Summer Top
Two Dogs Dreaming Summer Top
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Two Dogs Dreaming Summer Top Two Dogs Dreaming Summer Top Two Dogs Dreaming Summer Top
NORTH

Two Dogs Dreaming Summer Top

Pre-orders of this collection were generously hosted by ING Dreamstarter & StartSomeGood as a crowdfunding campaign running from the 19th of June - July 19, 2018.
Crowdfunding pre-orders have now closed.
Please email us should you wish to hold a piece of stock on order.

By Murdie Nampijinpa Morris

Silk Linen Blend

 

Summer Top

The Summer top is a close fitting, sleeveless cut top designed to wear through the Summer days and nights.

Featuring a slightly higher neckline, scooped open back and cropped length, it is perfect teamed with high waisted bottoms.

The darted bust and subtle a-line give this top a flattering fit and neat finish. Featuring two button closure at back. 

 

Malikijarra Jukurrpa (Two Dogs Dreaming)

This painting depicts ‘malikijarra Jukurrpa’ (two dogs Dreaming). The ‘kirda’ (owners) of this Dreaming are Nampijinpa/Nangala women and Jampijinpa/Jangala men.

This Dreaming comes from country adjacent to the windmill at Warlarla (Rabbit Flat). This site is part of a long Dreaming track that stretches from Yarrajalpa in the extreme west of Warlpiri country to Warlaku (Ali Curung) in the east. In this Dreaming story, two dog ancestors, a Jampijinpa and a Napangardi, traveled from the west to the east. They began at Yarrajalpa (a waterhole) and traveled through Wirninginpa, Jinarli, Karljawarnu (a rockhole), Jilwirrpa, and Waanjurna (a rockhole). They dug holes in the ground and created ‘warnirri’ (rockholes) and ‘ngapa’ (waterholes) as they went.

At Tapu (a rockhole), the two dogs separated. The female dog, Napangardi, went to the south towards Ngamarnawarnu. The male dog, Jampijinpa, went to the north through Mukirri and Paruwu. Eventually, he became lonely and howled for Napangardi in the south. She came running to him, and they married each other at Ngarnka. They wore men’s and women’s marriage headdresses, and Jampijinpa painted himself with white clay for the ceremony. After the wedding, they continued on slowly to the east through Kurduwijawija, Warlarla (Rabbit Flat), and Yurlpuwarnu (rockholes). At Yurlpuwarnu they started a fire using a ‘jimanypa’ (stick), a spear-thrower, and ‘yinirn ’ (bat-wing coral tree [Erythrina vesper lio]) wood for firewood. The dogs then continued east through Kulpurlunu (a waterhole) and Ngumurlungu, where they encountered some other dogs. However, these dogs sent them away while they performed a sacred ceremony.

The two dogs continued running east, past Jarramarda and Yankirrikirlangu, before arriving in Warlaku (Ali Curung). Many other dogs were living in Warlaku when they arrived. There were many families of dogs, mothers and fathers and children and uncles all living together. Jampijinpa and Napangardi made a burrow to rest in and started a big family of dogs there. They chose to stay in Warlaku and live with all the other dogs. In this way, the ‘malikijarra Jukurrpa’ (two dogs Dreaming) tells the story of proper conduct in families and marriages.

In Warlpiri paintings, traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa and other elements. The ribcages of the Jampijinpa, Napangardi, and their family of dogs are depicted in this work. Their ribs can also be seen as features in the landscape in the Yankirrikirlangu area. Concentric circles are used to represent the ‘ngapa’ (waterholes) around Yankirrikirlangu.